art and writing references
Royal Hierarchy

howdoesmewrite:

EMPIRE

  • Emperor/Empress, Kaiser/Kaiserin, Tsar/Tsaritsa: rules over everyone

KINGDOM

  • High King/High Queen, Maharajah, Pharaoh: rules over other kings
  • King/Queen, Sultan/Sultana, Shah/Shahbanu, Raja/Rani, Rex: rules over everything (Europe) or leader of a large area or province (ancient Egypt, Persia, India)
  • Crown Prince/Crown Princess, Emir/Emira, Dauphin: also called the heir apparent, next in line for the throne
  • Prince/Princess: other children of the imperial or royal family

ARCHDUCHY

  • Archduke/Archduchess: ruler of an archduchy

DUCHY/DUKEDOM

  • Duke/Duchess: ruler of a duchy; highest rank under the royal family; While some duchies have their own lineage, members of the royal/imperial family can also be dukes (ex. Queen Elizabeth II is the Duke of Normandy)

MARQUESSATE, MARGRAVIATE, OR MARCH

  • Marquess, Margrave, Marquis/Marchioness: the ruler of a marquessate, margraviate, or march

COUNTY

  • Count, Earl/Countess: ruler of a county; known as an earl in England, but their wives are still countesses

VISCOUTY

  • Viscount/viscountess: ruler of a viscounty; rank below counts/earls

BARONY

  • Baron/baroness: ruler of a barony

OTHER

  • Baronet: British title ranking below baron and above knight
  • Seigneur/Knight of the Manor: rules a small local fief
  • Knight: basic rank; used to denote someone who owned land and fought on behalf of their overlord
  • Baron/baroness (Scotland only): ranks below a knight and above a laird; hereditary position
  • Laird (Scotland only): ranks below a Scottish baron and above an esquire; landowner’s title
  • Esquire: indicates someone who attends or is apprenticed to a knight
  • Gentleman: the lowest rank of gentry; owns a small manor or plot of land

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

Some Writing Prompt Generators

electricseafarer:

needlekind:

Serendipity (names, places, mapbuilding, etc.)
Quick Story Idea
Full Story Idea
Writing Challenges
General Character
Quick Character
really just all of Seventh Sanctum
RPGesque generators
Writing Prompts
Inspiration Finder
Story Arc
Fantasy Story Situaton
Adventure
Chaotic Shiny is just really good in general
Random Plot 

These are writing generators but I always think generators are neat for inspiration. Anyone know any good drawing prompt generators?

cleverhelp:

Write Rhymes finds rhymes for your words while you write and takes the weirdness out of poetry and scheming. 

cleverhelp:

Write Rhymes finds rhymes for your words while you write and takes the weirdness out of poetry and scheming. 

prompts-and-pointers:

spookyjoel:

HEY WRITER FRIENDS
there’s this amazing site called realtimeboardwhich is like a whiteboard where you can plan and draw webs and family trees and timelines and all that sort of stuff. you can also insert videos, documents, photos, and lots of other things. you can put notes and post-its and, best of all, you can invite other people to be on the board with you and edit together!! 
this is really really awesome and a great tool for novel planning, so if you’re doing nanowrimo…. this could be good for you!!

This is a great website and helped me to lay out so many things. Use it. It’s beautiful.

prompts-and-pointers:

spookyjoel:

HEY WRITER FRIENDS

there’s this amazing site called realtimeboardwhich is like a whiteboard where you can plan and draw webs and family trees and timelines and all that sort of stuff. you can also insert videos, documents, photos, and lots of other things. you can put notes and post-its and, best of all, you can invite other people to be on the board with you and edit together!! 

this is really really awesome and a great tool for novel planning, so if you’re doing nanowrimo…. this could be good for you!!

This is a great website and helped me to lay out so many things. Use it. It’s beautiful.

Writing Asexuality in Fiction - Masterpost

anagnori:

I’ve finally built up a nice series of essays on writing asexuality and asexual characters in fiction. Here they are, all together in one place. They’re intended to be useful for asexual and non-asexual writers alike. They are also meant to be inclusive of gray-asexual and demisexual characters, although my knowledge is limited there.

These essays assume you already have a basic knowledge of what asexuality means: a general lack of sexual attraction to other people. This is not Asexuality 101; for that, check out the links on my resources page.

Other potentially relevant topics

This post may be updated in the future as I write more stuff on this subject; I’ll link to it from my blog’s homepage so it’s easy to find.

Fancies guide to FUCKING GENERIC POSES (Shitdraws Edition)

shamelessfancies:

Hi, I’m ShamelessFancies and I’m about to explain some generic poses. Why am I calling them generic? Because everyone uses them for a goddamn reason.

Example 1: The 3/4 of they way Pose aka The “3D” Pose
image

It’s basically the most simple pose, and one of the best for showing off a character’s design if it’s the first preview. It shows more than a sideways design, more than a forward design, and is a common staple for any artist. There is no, and I mean no person out there that draws that hasn’t done this pose.

Example 2: The “Tough Guy” or Crouching Pose While Looking Down
image

Have a tough character? No? Whatever. This is a common pose. The arched back, the looking down, the arms either to the side, or crossed in front of them. If someone wants their character to either look intimidating, or look like they have something to prove, they’ve probably done this before. It doesn’t even have to be crouched legs. A hunched back with arms in defensive position means the character means business.


Example 3: The Innocent Pose aka “Legs Together and Kawaii as Fuck”
image

Usually this is for a cute affect.  Legs are usually splayed at the knees, the arms are out and and all “Aww look at me and how cute I am.” It’s not a bad pose for either children characters, “lolita” characters, “shota” or whatever you’re going for. Or heck, even just as practice.



Q&A and Common Misconceptions:

Q: Is it bad to use these poses?

A: Hell no. These are a staple of most character previews! A lot of artists use them for a reason! They are expressive, and show of some of the features you are trying to express about your character, whether it be the clothes they wear, the scars they bear, or the personalities they hold.

Q: Are these good starter positions to practice character design in?

A: Yes! They are honestly some of the foundations of character design, and follow principles of flow and dynamic postures. If you’re having a hard time posing your characters, or having them feel more “alive,” this is a great place to start!


Misconception: Hey…someone is using the same pose as me! They obviously stole fro—

STOP. FUCKING STOP RIGHT THERE. No, shut up and sit down. These are generic poses, everyone uses them, everyone. No one has some special patent on any fucking position you draw your character in. If the body can articulate that way, you are allowed to draw them that way. Hell, if the body doesn’t bend that way, you can fucking draw it doing that too. NO one, and I mean no one has some sort of magical plot of land that tells them they are the only ones that can draw their characters like this. Just because someone picks the same pose as you, doesn’t mean they are copying you. Just because you prefer a certain pose, and someone else drew something  before you did in that same pose, doesn’t mean you aren’t allowed to do it too.

TLDR: NO one is fucking entitled to tell you what position to draw your characters in and if they try to, ignore them because they have no idea wtf they are talking about.

Got writer’s block? Try this little trick.

hefairbanks:

You’ll need paper, a pen, a handful of highlighters or colored markers, and whatever you’re working on. Using the paper and pen, copy your last page or two by hand. Don’t change the content yet. When you’re finished, read through the penned copy and look for anything you feel could be improved or tweaked. Don’t erase or scratch anything out. Instead, use the markers to make changes. Draw big swooping arrows to move things around, in different colors. Want to add a word? Do it in pink, or green. Or purple. If you can’t find anything to change, read through it again and highlight the parts you like, again in different colors. And draw stars, pumpkins or exclamation points.

Using color and changing the physical method of expression stimulates the creative half of the brain, your “right brain,” and encourages it to reopen communication with the analytical half of your mind, or the left brain. Like most artists, most writers are right-brain-dominant, heavy on creativity. However, we also depend on our left brains for the tools of writing. When you stimulate your creative mind with color and fanciful images combined with your analyical prose and sentence structure, it can open the channels of communication and get the ideas flowing once more.

Hi, I'm writing a character who is asexual. How do I convey this accurately and respectfully, without it just being that there simply isn't a romance plot surrounding her?
Anonymous
How do you build suspense in a story? Like a horror story, for instance, what could you do to make the reader absolutely terrified of what will happen next?
stinerbros:

The Five Elements of Story
http://writerswrite.co.za/the-five-elements-of-a-story
clevergirlhelps:

Biology
Biology
Creating a Race (2)
Creating Animals (2)
Disease (2)
Ecosystems (2)
Evolution (and Space)
Flora and Fauna
Genetics
Inventing Species
List of Legendary Creatures
Night Vision/Color Vision
People
Constructed Language (Conlang)
Basics/Phonology (2) (3)
Conlang
Conlang Guide
Conlang vs. English
Creating a Language (Revised)
Culture + Language
Curse Words
How to Create Your Own Language
How to Create a Language
IPA Pronunciation
Making Up Words
Culture Guides
7 Deadly Sins
Alien Cultures (2)
Alternative Medieval
Avoiding Cultural Appropriation
Avoiding Medieval Fantasy (2)
Avoiding One-Note Worlds
Avoiding Utopia
Change (2)
Class/Caste System (2)
Culture
Designing Intellectual Movements
Everything (2) (3)
Fantasy
Gender-Equal Societies
Historical Background for Ideas (2)
History
Matriarchy (2)
Nationalism
Nations
Slavery
Static World
Structure
Wandering Peoples
Economy
Basic Economics
Capitalism
Currency (2) (3)
Current Global Economies
Economic Systems
Economics (1500-1800 AD)
Economics and Government
Economics for Dummies
Economy
Inflation
International Trade (2)
Marxist Communism
Medieval Economics
Schools of Economic Thought
Socialism (2)
Types of Economic Systems
World Economy (2)
Everyday Life
Art
Ceremonies
Clothing
Clothing Terminology (2) (3) (4)
Clothing Reference
Demographics
Disease
Drugs
Education (2)
Fame and Infamy
Family
Food (2)
Food Timeline
Immigration/Emigration
Literature
Marriage
Months
Music
Sex
Slang
Stories
Travel
Government
Collective/Traditionalist Societies
Creating a Government
Diplomacy
Empire (2)
Fancy Latin Names for Government
History and Politics
International Relations (2)
Justice System
Lawlessness
Non-monarchical (2) (3)
Oppressive Government
Political Ideologies
Propaganda
Republic
Rise and Fall of Civilizations
Secret Societies
Shapeshifter Society
Totalitarianism, Atmosphere Necessary For
Tribal Society
Types of Government
Utopia
Writing Politics
Read More

clevergirlhelps:

Biology

Constructed Language (Conlang)

Culture Guides

Economy

Everyday Life

Government

Read More

the-tincan-alchemist:

sirblizzard:

How to draw ‘the other eye’. Because people keep complaining.
The answer? You don’t draw a whole eye first.
You do it part by part, then make adjustments and add details as you please. 
If you draw the whole eye first you’ll just stress over making the other eye as similar as possible. This way it’s also easier to adjust and correct.
Aside from that last step with the ‘transform’ tool, this also applies for traditional art.
Hope this helps!

THE WORLD MUST KNOW

the-tincan-alchemist:

sirblizzard:

How to draw ‘the other eye’. Because people keep complaining.


The answer? You don’t draw a whole eye first.

You do it part by part, then make adjustments and add details as you please. 

If you draw the whole eye first you’ll just stress over making the other eye as similar as possible. This way it’s also easier to adjust and correct.

Aside from that last step with the ‘transform’ tool, this also applies for traditional art.

Hope this helps!

THE WORLD MUST KNOW

madhattie3:

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Kiss Scene rough sketches - Drawing for Boys Love (Yaoi)‘  A 103 page book/CD rom with male/male kissing scenes, from many different angles, for artist drawing references.

Other art references like this can be found here:

A fabulous fuck-ton of male/male love references (per request).

And I’m gonna add the following:
DO NOT JUDGE THE IMAGES BY THE PIXELATED THUMBNAILS. These are very good/accurate poses once you enlarge ‘em (I wouldn’t be sharin’ ‘em if they weren’t).

…. I have this book….

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:
Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.
Word Counts:
Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.
Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.
A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.
Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.
But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.
General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 
Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.
As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.
Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.
World Building:
Fantasy World Building Questionnaire
Magical World Builder’s Guide
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Religions
Quick and Dirty World Building
World Building Links
Fantasy World Building Questions
The Seed of Government (2)
Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy
Fantasy Worlds and Race
Water Geography
Alternate Medieval Fantasy Story
Writing Magic
Types of Magic
When Magic Goes Wrong
Magic-Like Psychic Abilities
Science and Magic
Creative Uses of Magic
Thoughts on Creating Magic Systems
Defining the Sources, Effects, and Costs of Magic
World Building Basics
Mythology Master Post
Fantasy Religions
Setting the Fantastic in the Everyday World
Making Histories
Matching Your Money to Your World
Building a Better Beast
A Man in Beast’s Clothing
Creating and Using Fictional Languages
Creating a Language
Creating Fictional Holidays
Creating Holidays
Weather and World Building 101
Describing Fantastic Creatures
Medieval Technology
Music For Your Fantasy World
A heterogeneous World
Articles on World Building
Cliches:
Grand List of Fantasy Cliches (most of this can be debated)
Fantasy Cliches Discussion
Ten Fantasy Cliches That Should Be Put to Rest
Seven Fantasy Cliches That Need to Disappear
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches 101
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliche Meter: The Bad Guys
Fantasy Novelist’s Exam
Mary Sue Race Test
Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS
Read More

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:

  • Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
  • Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
  • Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
  • Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
  • Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
  • Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
  • Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
  • Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
  • Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
  • Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
  • Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
  • Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
  • Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
  • High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
  • Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
  • Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
  • Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
  • Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
  • Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
  • Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
  • Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
  • Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.

Word Counts:

Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.

Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.

A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.

Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.

But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.

  • General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
  • Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
  • Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
  • YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
  • Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 

Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.

As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.

Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.

World Building:

Cliches:

Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS

Read More